Butterfly iQ

A vascular specialist John Martin has tried a pocket-sized ultrasound gadget created by Butterfly Network, a startup situated in Guilford, Connecticut. The Butterfly iQ is the principal solid state ultrasound machine to reach the market in the U.S, according to technology review.

The Butterfly iQ Ultrasound works by shooting sound into the body and catching the echoes. Normally, the sound waves are created by a vibrating crystal. However, Butterfly’s machine rather utilizes 9,000 tiny drums consolidated on a semiconductor chip.

The Surgeon had been having an uncomfortable feeling of thickness in his throat. So he thought of utilizing this contraption with an iPhone which is the size and state of an electric razor, alongside his neck. This blend empowered him to analyze his tumor.

The Butterfly iQ associates with your iPhone and looks somewhat like an electric razor. Place it on the zone of the body you wish to look at and a high contrast ultrasound picture will show up on your cellular device.

The Butterfly iQ is bringing innovations in the market that might replace traditional medical devices

The Butterfly iQ’s convenience implies it could be utilized as a part of ambulances or at home. The gadget’s maker, Butterfly Network, trusts it can consolidate artificial intelligence into the product so that even a typical user will have the capacity to utilize it.

Butterfly was started in 2011 by Jonathan Rothberg, an entrepreneur who specializes in adapting semiconductor technology to biology. He previously invented a method of sequencing DNA on a chip. The company, which has raised more than $100 million so far, is entering a market already crowded with an earlier generation of portable ultrasound scanners like Philips’s Lumify, which costs around $6,000 and uses the older crystal technology.

The Butterfly iQ will soon be accessible for commercial utilization and will begin transporting in 2018 for $1,999 which is equivalent to 2,00,000 rupees.

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Image via TechMundo