Researchers Discover Way of Measuring Blood Pressure via Selfie Videos

blood pressure

As per a newly developed imaging technology one would be able to measure the blood pressure just by taking a selfie video instead of paying a visit to some doctor.

The researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered that a selfie video might be all the thing one needs for measuring blood pressure by developing a new technology referred to as the transdermal optical imaging—TOI.

The technology functions by taking into consideration the fact that the facial skin of humans is translucent, as per the reports of Engadget.

Smartphones are provided with optical sensors that could capture the light reflected from the haemoglobin present below the skin. This permits the TOI to visualize and also measure the changes in the blood flow.

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For testing the technology, the team made use of TOI to study 2-minute selfie videos of 1,328 adults captured with an iPhone. In contrast to the conventional methods of measuring the blood pressure, the team was able to measure 3 types of blood pressure with some 95percent accuracy.

Additionally, the TOI was able to study the face in pre-recorded videos too.

As per the reports of Fox News, the application allows people to test TOI for themselves, enabling them to record a 30-second video of their face and receive measurements of the stress levels and the resting hearting rate.

Lee-the lead author of the study added that more research work is needed for assuring that the measurements are as accurate as possible since the study did not test people with very fair or dark skin complexion.

The team also mentioned that there are many future applications for the technology, which includes providing health services to the people who reside in the remote area with limited access.

Furthermore, it could assist people at risk of hypertension or hypotension related illness in order for tracking their blood pressure without needing any dedicated device.

Lee further added that if one sets up a computer or phone, one could get a doctor who is let’s suppose in Toronto then one could talk to each other and do the diagnosis simultaneously.

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