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SAN FRANCISCO: Following the complaints from huge media groups like News Corp about their effected sales Google announced on Sunday that their subscription news websites would no more be facilitating users with three free articles every day.

From years, Google’s “first click free” policy assistance ensured that non-subscribers could access news articles from searches without being bothered by the paywalls. Google, the major component of Alphabet Inc, had contended that free samples would lead to improved subscriptions. But apart from some publications, online subscriptions did not go as was planned. Wall Street Journal parent News Corp like media firms complained that freeloading users were cutting into sales.

This year, the Wall Street Journal stopped obeying Google’s policy, resulting in a drop-in search ranking but growth in subscriptions.

He said that last year the count of news outlets with paywalls had attained a certain mass, to the point that it made sense for Google to initiate making tools for them. Google at present is relying on relaxed rules and subscription software that is under construction to stop the Wall Street Journal and other publishers from keeping important content.

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From now on, publishers will be choosing the count of free articles, if any they want to offer for Google searches. Google is also working on launching a free software in near future for publishers that will make the users pay for the content with their credit card information that they would have already provided to Google.

The objective is to provide fast purchases at a single click, said by Gingras. Customer details like names and addresses would be shared with the publishers. A separate feature would be given to publishers that would give them data on how to increase sign-ups with personalized offers. Gingras said Google has not decided yet whether it would be charging a fee for recovering costs of that program.

“Google search is valuable because there’s a rich ecosystem out there. To the extent the web is healthy, that’s very good for our core business. Our objective is not for this to be a new line of business,” Gingras said.

Alphabet’s top rival Facebook is also working on same subscriber registration tools. Last year Apple launched support for subscriptions within its News app.