Pakistan and Russia have signed a historic military cooperation pact. Under the agreement signed by both the nations, Pakistan officers will be allowed to get training in Russia.

As reported by international media, Russians want to step up and remove the gap that was created after the United States halted security aid to Pakistan.

As the inaugural meeting between Russia and Pakistan Joint Military Consultative Committee in Rawalpindi concluded, this deal was made. From Pakistan, Defence Secretary Zamirul Hassan Shah and from Russia, Deputy Defense Minister Col Gen Alexander Fomin headed the meeting.

The statement from the ministry stated, “The two sides also held in-depth discussions on avenues of future cooperation. In the end, both countries signed the Contract on Admission of Service Members of Pakistan in the RF [Russian Federation’s] Training Institutes.”

Also read: Pakistan offers ‘multidimensional strategic partnership’ to Russia for the first time

Since the signing of an agreement between Pakistan & Russia for encouraging bilateral relations in 2013, cooperation has increased between the two nations in the defense sector.

Previously Russia sold four Mi-35 combat helicopters to Pakistan. And both the nations held counter-terror military drills and an anti-drugs operation in the Arabian Sea. Reportedly Pakistani warships have taken part in the Russian Navy Day parade.

Russian ambassador to Pakistan, Alexey Dedov said,  “It was a very important event for us. Actually, an illustration of this importance is that this parade was taken by the commander-in-chief of Russian armed forces, President Putin. This cooperation is developing in many directions. So, there is quite a wide spectrum. And, of course, this is a reflection of our approach to the relations with Pakistan, which to our country has their own independent value for us.”

Baqir Sajjad, an Islamabad-based journalist said,  “Training at Russian military institutes would bring about a major shift in the worldview of the top [Pakistan] military officers. Until now, the brightest officers poised for leadership positions were trained in the US.”