Microsoft Gets Mad At Apple Over xCloud And Store Guidelines – Research Snipers

Microsoft Gets Mad At Apple Over xCloud And Store Guidelines

This week Microsoft announced when the game streaming is previously known as “Project xCloud” will officially start in mid-September. However, this is only the case on Android and not iOS. From Microsoft, there was now harsh criticism towards Apple.

These days Microsoft is a company that wants to offend as little as possible and almost always has only friendly words left for competitors. Currently, however, the Redmond company gave free rein to their anger and attacked Apple in an unusually direct manner. It is about the new mobile game streaming service from Xbox, because the company from Cupertino, California, did not allow it with a reference to the Apple Store guidelines.

Apple has previously confirmed this and announced that services such as xCloud and Google Stadia are not allowed or desired. The company told Business Insider that such offers were in violation of the guidelines.

Apple said:The App Store was created to give customers a safe and trustworthy place to discover and download apps and to be a great business opportunity for all developers. Before they are allowed into our store, we review all apps against the same guidelines, protect customers, and offer developers fair and equal competitive conditions.

What exactly the problem was with xCloud and Stadia, Apple did not say either, the Californians published a standard statement like this when they were approached on Stadia in March.

Microsoft is mad

Microsoft’s answer, however, was unusually sharp and clear: the Redmond company told that the test period had unfortunately expired and that no way had been found, the “vision of cloud games with Xbox Game Pass Ultimate” via the Apple App Store for gamers on iOS. Microsoft said:Apple is the only all-purpose platform that denies consumers cloud gaming and game subscription services like Xbox Game Pass. They treat gaming apps differently and apply milder rules to non-gaming apps, even if they contain interactive content.”

The Redmond-based company points out that all content is checked for content by independent organizations such as ESRB and also classified. “We believe the customer should be at the center of the gaming experience and players tell us they want to play, connect, and share wherever they are. We agree.

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