London Court To Take Legal Action Against Google Amid 4 million iPhone Users Data Breach

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The London Court of appeal has overturned last year’s verdict and allows to take legal action against Google for collecting 4 million iPhone users data illegally.

According to the details Google has been blamed to tweak privacy settings of Safari from June 2011 to February 2012, illegally collecting data on iPhone users browsing. Last year in May a group called “Google You Owe Us” filed a lawsuit against Google in UK high court claiming that Google has bypassed Safari between June 2011 and February 2012, due to ‘changed’ privacy settings Google has obtained browsing data of iPhone users as many as 4 million for the purpose of selling information to advertisers.

“The group demanded Google to pay £3.2 billion in compensation to the users whose privacy was infringed. The group also demanded to list the case as a representative lawsuit which is equivalent to a class action.”

However, London High Court on October 2018 ruled that Google’s role in collecting user’s browser data was faulty and violated liability, also the plaintiff did not suffer any loss or damage under the UK’s data protection Act, therefore the class action was rejected.

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Richard Lloyd, the plaintiff’s representative said, “Wednesday’s ruling sends a clear message to Google and other big companies that they are accountable in the UK and they cannot bypass the law.”

He also said that large firms like Google are accountable in this country, they cannot simply infringe user’s data protection rights and profit from it, the consumer groups can unite and request the court for compensation. This is an interesting development in the United Kingdom where large tech companies like Google are under the radar, if the London Court rules out in consumer’s favor and ask Google to pay the compensation, it would set an example for other countries to go after Google and seek compensation for their infringed rights if any.

Google also came under the fire after authorities in the US raised their eyebrows over encrypted DNS testing.

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