Google Messages is testing animation reactions for message

Google Messages is a feature-rich messaging app that comes pre-installed on Samsung Galaxy and Google Pixel devices. The business has recently updated the app’s visual design. Following this pattern, we have now discovered animated message reactions, another feature that is still in development for the Messages app. This hidden feature in Messages adds a little extra flair to the already-minimal animation that occurs when you respond to a message using the standard emoji options.

According to dependable source AssembleDebug writing for SpAndroid, these new animations were concealed within Google Messages beta (20231121_01_RC00) and could be unlocked by toggling a few flags. Though it appears to be restricted to a few emoji alternatives that appear when long-pressing a text, each animation is distinct and adds extra flavor to your conversations.

These animations resemble those on chat apps like Telegram, as AssembleDebug correctly points out, although Google’s animations seem noticeably larger on the screen. When reacting with the sad/crying emoji, as demonstrated in the video below, I especially like to utilize an umbrella.

It’s difficult to predict when these features will make it into the stable version of Google Messages because they require manually enabling flags. It’s difficult to predict when these features will make it into the stable version of Google Messages because they require manually enabling flags. Additionally, AssembleDebug does not indicate which flags were flipped for these new animations to appear. Still, this is a useful feature for Google Messages and would add a little more soul to your regular chats.

In terms of little feature enhancements, the Messages team has been rather busy during the last few months. We witnessed the broader use of account-based device pairing, which greatly simplified the process of accessing chats across several platforms, including tablets and laptops. Recently, Google Messages has been testing the use of a new “noise cancellation” feature to muffle background noise in voice notes.

In the meantime, fans of RCS-based messaging, such as Google, have good news to report: after Apple said that it will continue to support RCS through 2024, users of iPhones and Android devices will be able to text securely and seamlessly, potentially putting an end to the long-running controversy between blue and green bubbles. Though it’s possible that the iPhone manufacturer made this decision in response to criticism from the European Commission rather than because of Nothing’s now-famous workaround or Google’s strong advertising campaigns, Comparably, European regulations played a key role in convincing Apple to (finally) implement USB-C for iPhones this year. For some time now, USB-C has been a standard feature on some of the top Android phones.

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