Four apps on Google dubbed as spyware – Research Snipers

Four apps on Google dubbed as spyware

four apps on Google

 Spyware is a very serious threat in digital world. It can come handy to track user location and also spy on their personal information such as emails or social media accounts. The mobile security company Lookout has reported four apps on Google PlayStore that were spying on users. These apps have been termed as malicious spyware that are a potential threat to individual privacy.

Lookout reports four apps on Google as spyware

Lookout has named this spyware code as Overseer which collects user position and collects information on user email. The code of Overseer is able to track user latitude and longitude. Kristy Edwards, the product manager for security research at Lookout discussed that this sort of information is very valuable to attackers. It gives location which helps in tracking a person down.

Cnet reports that, Embassy is one of the apps on Google PlayStore that uses the code Overseer. The app is advertised as a look up service for embassies. Users can find their embassy in foreign cities through it. The application then turns user phone into homing devices.

It sends out email contact lists to accounts hosted on Facebook and Amazon servers. The other three apps on Google PlayStore are advertised as new apps. Each one of them contains the code Overseer and does not work.

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Source from the company Lookout confirmed that Google PlayStore has removed the apps but Google has not yet commented on the issue. Experts at Lookout are not sure from where the spyware Overseer appeared from or who is behind this creation. The spyware has dodged detection by using a novel technique. The good news for people is that the spyware has not been identified in any other mobile app store till now. Users are advised to run a cleanup check through their phone.

The question arises is that why was Overseer sending user information to account hosted by a Facebook server.

Image via pcworld