NASA's

While NASA’s Wanderers have searched for indications of life outside of our reality, they haven’t looked for life specifically. In any case, Melissa Floyd, a researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, is taking a shot at a gadget that may change that. She needs to assemble a gadget that could glance through soil and rock samples for proof of microbes or another sort of single-celled microorganism called archaea.

These life forms are thought to have been the first to show up on Earth and Floyd started to think about whether possibly life on close-by planets advanced as it did alone.

 “I had this idea, actually a major assumption on my part: what if life evolved on Mars the same way it did here on Earth? Certainly, Mars was bombarded with the same soup of chemistry as Earth,” Floyd said in a statement.

Be that as it may, searching specifically for life on another planet isn’t simple. Furthermore, the real test here is to build up a machine and a convention that can adequately recreate what researchers do here on Earth.

Floyd trusts that a system called fluorescent in situ hybridization is the best alternative for this venture, and she’s taking a shot at automating that procedure.

At the point when a researcher utilizes this specific strategy, they need to put an example of something on a slide, treat the cells of that example to make them permeable, include a molecular probe that will append to specific sequences of DNA or RNA in the cell, warm the example and after that take a look at it under a microscope.

Furthermore, those are only the principle steps – there are various others in this procedure.  “I’m trying to determine whether I can do the same thing with a robot,” said Floyd.

On the off chance that such a robot can be built, NASA could then send it all alone or as a major aspect of a rover to another planet or moon in our nearby planetary group. It might appear a difficult request, however, it could give researchers another great gadget with which to look for extraterrestrial life.

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Image via wonderopolis