Now You Can Feel The Weather Forecast With Tempescope

tempescope-weather-forecast-gadget

Have you ever wondered what if you could witness the weather changes with naked eyes?

In 2012, Ken Kawamoto, a Japanese Google software engineer, developed his first physical weather predictor – Tempescope. The device is connected to an online weather source and shows the next day’s forecast.

This device is a box-shaped gadget, which is about 60 cm in height and 15 cm in breadth. The device is easy to carry and can be placed anywhere in your home.

Two pumps, an ultrasound diffuser, and a LED are the three elemental parts forming Tempescope. These parts adjusts themselves according to the online weather source and forecast a smaller version of the weather in that tiny box:

  • When it’s predicted to rain the next day, the pumps get to work. Water from the lower chamber of is pumped upwards to reach the higher end, and then the water sprinkles from the holes drilled at the top.
  • Clouds are also produced in this small device. The ultrasound diffuser produces mist and is pushed upwards to forecast a cloudy day ahead.
  • For sunlight and lightning, the LED turns itself on. LED will turn itself on at intervals when it’s a lightning prediction. And a full-colored LED forecasts a sunny day.

Tempescope does not only predicts the next day’s weather, but it can also forecast an hour-by-hour weather forecast in that little gadget.

The earlier version of Tempescope used a USB or Bluetooth device to connect to a PC. Now it can connect to a weather app on a PC or a mobile app via the internet, to forecast the weather.

Tempescope, not only is a weather forecaster, but it can also save the data using an SD card installed in it. And can be replayed as according to your own mood. So, when you want to relax and enjoy a nice calm evening reading a book, you just need to recall a rainy day.

You can also set the gadget to display only a particular weather, weather for the next hour, or a forecast animation of the next day.

Ken has a team of engineers and designers. But he needs funds for the mass production of the weather forecaster.

Ken, now plans to take the gadget to the next level by making it snow, blow the wind, create real lightning bolts, and show land features. Ken has also released his codes and instruction, letting anyone build their own a real weather forecaster.

Image by: indiegogo

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Muhammad Bilal

Muhammad recently joined FM 99 as a freelance copywriter. He is also working as a freelance editor with an underprocessed magazine. Being a content writer for long, he is now more inclined towards social media marketing. For more content, Research Snipers is the place to follow him.

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