Are you a patient of high blood pressure? If yes, then the new research has provided you with an amazing solution. As per study, listening to classical music along with taking medicines might give you an added advantage as researchers have found that the music majorly increased the effect of the anti-hypertensive drugs.

Music boosts the advantageous effects of medication after a short time it is consumed to control the high blood pressure. This study was published in the journal of Scientific Reports.

The study coordinator—Vitor Engracia Valenti—a Professor at the Sao Paulo State University (UNESP) in Brazil said that they observed that the music improves the heart rate and boosted on the effect of the anti-hypertensives for about an hour after they are taken.

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For conducting the study, the researchers performed an experiment for measuring the effects of musical auditory stimulus linked with anti-hypertensive medication on the heart rate and blood pressure, among a small number of patients with well-controlled hypertension.

On one day, the patients after they consumed their oral anti-hypertensive medicine, were made to listen to the instrumental music through earphones for sixty minutes at the same volume. As a control, the patients were made to go through the same research protocol but this time the earphones were not turned on.

The heart rate variability was measured at rest and then at 20, 40 and 60 minutes after the oral medication.

Several statistical and mathematical techniques were incorporated to find the differences between the heart rates at various times, with greater precision and sensitivity.

The data analysis revealed that the heart rate diminished majorly after sixty minutes of the medicine intake. Heart rate did not fall as significantly in the patients when they did not listen to music.

Valenti said that it was observed that the effect of antihypertension medication on heart rate was enhanced by listening to music.

One of the hypotheses proposed by the researchers was that the music stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system—which controls the body at rest, slows down the heart, lowers the blood pressure and stabilises the blood sugar and the emergency hormone—adrenaline.

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